Social Media Helps Fuel Teacher Activism Across the Country

Labor News

In this March 9, 2018, file photo, Nema Brewer, an employee of the Fayette County School District, uses a protest sign as a makeshift bullhorn to shout at the Kentucky Senate chambers in protest of Kentucky Senate Bill 1, in Frankfort, Kentucky. The public education uprisings that began in West Virginia and spread to Arizona, Oklahoma and Kentucky share similar origin stories. Teachers, long tired of low wages and a dearth of state funding, begin talking to each other online. Their Facebook groups draw tens of thousands of members. They share stories of their frustrations and then they demand change. (Timothy Easley, File/Associated Press)

Reprinted from The Washington Post by Melissa Daniels on April 19, 2018.

The public education uprisings that began in West Virginia and spread to Arizona, Oklahoma and Kentucky share similar origin stories.

Teachers, long tired of low wages and a dearth of state funding, begin talking to each other online.

Their Facebook groups draw tens of thousands of members. They share stories of their frustrations and then they demand change.

Kentucky public school employee Nema Brewer co-founded the KY120 United Facebook group that drew more than 40,000 members in a month. Teachers there are calling for more education funding, triggering actions that forced more than 30 schools to close last Friday.

“We had no idea it would light a fire under people,” Nema Brewer said. …

Washington Post 4/19

About Jeffrey Burman 2662 Articles
Jeff Burman represents assistant editors on the Guild’s Board of Directors. He can be reached at jeffrey.s.burman.57@gmail.com.

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