This Quarter in Film History

When the South Rose Again

One century ago, on February 8, 1915, David Wark Griffith’s ‘The Birth of a Nation’ premiered under its original title, The Clansman, at Clune’s Auditorium in Los Angeles. […]

This Quarter in Film History

Les Beatles Nouvelle Vague: A Hard Day For Night

It is hard to believe now, but in the early 1960s, the young, long-haired Liverpudlian lads John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr (known collectively as the Beatles) were considered to be an insidious force, challenging British as well as American stereotypes of youthful masculinity, just as their distinctive, infectious “beat music” threatened to take over the pop charts of both countries. […]

This Quarter in Film History

Separating the Bums from the Contenders

Sixty years after its premiere in June 1954 in Japan, of all places (New York and Los Angeles followed in July), ‘On the Waterfront’ is still regarded as a seminal film because of its immense influence on acting. […]

This Quarter in Film History

Dancing with Myself

Cover Girl (1944) is a famous movie for two reasons — one intentional and the other accidental. The film’s legacy is of a time when women were celebrated for their glamour and sexuality. […]

This Quarter in Film History

Sex Sells… a Century Ago

The early silent film Traffic in Souls (1913) remains just as timely as when it was released 100 years ago. The sex slave trade today operates with the same methodology as depicted in this exposé of forced prostitution based on the Rockefeller White Slavery Report of 1910. […]

This Quarter in Film History

Making Love and War

From Here to Eternity (1953) is a transitional film in the American motion picture industry. It is probably the first major Hollywood release to express anti-establishment themes and the new morality. […]